Category Archives: City Hall

City eyes Sakai property for new police station

The Bainbridge Island Police Station on Winslow Way.
The Bainbridge Island Police Station on Winslow Way.

Locations for a new police station are back in front of City Council for discussion with a new site option.

The three places being considered are along Madison Avenue.

  • Sakai property on Madison Avenue near New Brooklyn Road, north of the land being bought by the island’s park district.
  • Property on New Brooklyn Road by the fire station headquarters on Madison Avenue.
  • Land north of the current City Hall.

None of the property options are owned by the city.

City Council also will discuss transferring Pritchard Park to the park district and future plans with the Suzuki property during Tuesday’s meeting.

Last day for election filing

It’s the last day of filing for the fall elections. While one City Council member has withdrawn, another has filed.

Here is the full list of candidates as of Friday morning:

City Council

At-large seat

Pegeen Mulhern

Ron Peltier

North Ward

Kol Medina

Susan D. Bergen, withdrew

Central Ward

Michael Scott, appointed earlier this year

South Ward

Sarah Blossom, incumbent

 

School Board

District 1

Lynn Smith

Tatiana Epanchin-Troyan

Duncan C. Macfarlane

District 3

Mev Hoberg, incumbent

District 4

Tim Kinkead, incumbent

 

Fire Commissioner

Position 1

Scott Isenman, incumbent

 

Park Board

Position 2

Ken DeWitt, incumbent

John Grinter

Position 4

Jay Kinney, incumbent

 

Sewer District No. 7 Commissioner

Position 3

Sarah Lee, incumbent

Mary Victoria Dombrowski

Candidates begin filing for local elections

While the island’s City Council and school board have a handful of seats on this year’s election ballot, there is only one race where multiple candidate have filed.

City Council
Susan Bergen and Kol Medina have filed for the North Ward to replace Anne Blair, who is not running for reelection.
Pegeen Mulhern has filed for the at-large seat to replace Steve Bonkowski, who also announced he is not running for reelection.
Michael Scott, appointed to the Central Ward earlier this year, and Sarah Blossom, who represents the South Ward, are running for their current seats.

School Board
Mev Hoberg and Tim Kinkead have filed for reelection and do not have any opponents as of Wednesday morning.
Patty Fielding will not be running for reelection to the school board, and Lynn Smith has filed for Fiedling’s position.

Candidates have until the end of the business day Friday to file.

Who is running for reelection?

Bainbridge Island City Council members Anne Blair and Steve Bonkowski have announced they will not be running for reelection this fall. Each have served one four-year term.

Council members Sarah Blossom and Michael Scott said they anticipate filing for reelection. The deadline to file is May 15.

Scott was appointed to the council this year after Councilman David Ward resigned as part of a public records lawsuit against the city.

A Kitsap County Superior Court judge ruled last year that Bainbridge city officials didn’t perform an “adequate” search for public records documents on Bonkowski’s and Ward’s personal computers.

Bonkowski said his decision not to run had nothing to do with the lawsuit, and he was not seeking reelection because he had done everything he set out to do on the council.

Blair said she would not be running so she could spend more time with her family.

The three other seats — held by Wayne Roth, Roger Townsend and Val Tollefson — are not up for reelection until 2017.

City goes all green with electric

420524_5531137_ver1.0_640_480City Council members voted 5-2 to buy 100 percent green energy for the city. Council members Sarah Blossom and Steve Bonkowski voted against it.

Bonkowski said he would vote against it because of the low percent  of residents who participate, which he correlated to green energy support.

About 13 percent of islanders participate in Puget Sound Energy’s Green Power Program. The program relies more on wind, bio-gas and solar-energy sources instead of coal.

The city had been buying about about 13 percent of its electricity from green energy to match the resident participation, costing about $3,000 a year. The city spends a total of $330,000 a year on electricity, and going to all green power would cost the city an additional $15,000 a year.

Going all the way with green energy?

420524_5531137_ver1.0_640_480City Council will discuss buying 100 percent green energy for the city’s electricity at its next business meeting in two weeks.

Puget Sound Energy’s Green Power Program relies more on wind, bio-gas and solar-energy sources instead of coal.

About 13 percent of the city’s electricity is from green energy, costing about $3,000 a year. The city spends a total of $330,000 a year on electricity, and going to all green power would cost the city an additional $15,000 a year.

The council decided to buy 13 percent green power from PSE last year, matching the percent of residents that use green power.

Two other Washington cities buy 100 percent green energy, said Heather Mulligan, PSE market manager. Those cities are Lacey and Bellingham.

City invests in phase II of Ferncliff Village

The first phase of Ferncliff Village development. (Brad Camp/Special to the Kitsap Sun)
The first phase of Ferncliff Village development. (Brad Camp/Special to the Kitsap Sun)

City Council agreed Tuesday to provide $150,000 for phase II of the Ferncliff Village, an affordable housing development by Housing Resources Bainbridge on the island.

Phase II will include 16 two and three bedroom townhomes, a playground and trails. Each townhome will cost about $200,000, according to the development’s website.

Housing Resources Bainbridge started the first phase of the development in 2011 and sold all of the homes by the fall of 2013.

The city will contribute $75,000 a year for two years after Housing Resources Bainbridge has a construction loan agreement.

Payments from the city will be reimbursements, and Housing Resources Bainbridge must submit receipts.

Parking proposed for Manitou Beach Drive

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A view from along Manitou Beach Drive. (Kitsap Sun file photo)

The city is proposing a “small parking area” on Manitou Beach Drive, making it easier for residents and guests to enjoy the city-owned waterfront property.

While there are views of Puget Sound and Seattle from the shoreline, Manitou Beach Drive is a narrow two-lane road without shoulders.

The city owns .13 acre of waterfront land across the street from 9865 Manitou Beach Drive, according  to the county parcel search.

The city owns about another acre next to 9865 Manitou Beach Drive, where six parking spots are being proposed.

A public meeting Wednesday night will help identify how many parking spots are needed or wanted for access to the waterfront, said Mark Epstein with the city’s capital projects coordinator.

The public meeting is at 6:30 p.m. in the City Council Chambers at City Hall, 280 Madison Avenue.

Manitou Beach Parking Alternative--six stall

Creative Space for artists proposed off Day Road

Bainbridge Island architect Michael Wangen talks to residents about the proposed Creative Space development.
Bainbridge Island architect Michael Wangen talks to residents about the proposed Creative Space development.

Developers and Bainbridge Island residents Dave Christianson and Terry McGuire shared details and took questions about their proposed community workspace for arts and artisan Monday night during a public meeting.

Christianson is with Tseng Properties, LLC, which is leading the development on a 4.5-acre property off of Day Road near the Bainbridge Island Saddle Club’s facility.

Only 1.5 acres of the site is buildable land because of wetlands, said Michael Wangen, the Bainbridge Island architect working on the project.

Construction on the 10-building project, known as Creative Space, could start as early as this summer and be finished in six to 12 months, said Christianson.

Island Craft, a similar artist development, is being constructed nearby Creative Space on Day Road.

All 10 of the Creative Space buildings are 40 feet by 48 feet, and proposed uses include boat and vehicle restoration, woodwork, painting or sculpture work. Space is not intended to be used for office or retails space, although there could be display and sales events open to the public, Christianson said.

Two of the buildings would be 1.5 stories with a 1,920-square-foot garage on the first floor and a 920-square-foot loft above. One building would be a residence for the facility’s manager. No other units would have residential space.

Eight of the buildings would be divided into two studio spaces, each side about 960 square feet, with the possibility a 440-square-foot storage loft. Tenants could potentially rent the whole building.

The developers want to rent space at about 75 cents a square foot, they said Monday.

McGuire said the goal is to rent the 960-square-foot studios for about $720. A unit with a loft would be about $1,050. The final price would depend on construction costs, which are still unknown, she said.

McGuire and Christianson also live next to and have their own personal workspace by the proposed development. They have lived on the island for about 25 years, Christianson said.

Access to Creative Space would be off of the same gravel road used to drive to the Saddle Club facility and Manzanita Park.

There are no proposed changes to the road or its overhead tree canopy, although about a dozen Saddle Club members at Monday’s meeting voiced concerns about who would maintain the road with the new development.

There is an easement for the road use and the county will be looking into who is responsible for the road’s upkeep according to that easement, said Heather Beckmann, a planner with the city.

Christianson said he was “willing to pony up” and help maintain the road.

“If I am causing wear and tear on the road, I have to cover the expense,” he said.

Saddle Club members also were concerned whether the road could handle more traffic and how how safe it would be because it has mainly been used as a trail.

Juliet LeDorze suggested creating a trail alongside the road for equestrians and pedestrians.

Beckmann said the city would talk to the park district about that possibility.

The project is in the pre-application phase and there will be another public comment period after an application has been submitted to the city.

FCC approves radio station for the island

Kitsap Sun file photo
Kitsap Sun file photo

The Federal Communications Commission recently granted the city of Bainbridge Island a 10-year license to operate an AM information radio station.

The city expects to have the station — which will be transmitted on 600k Hz and 1700 kHz — broadcasting in late summer or fall, according to the city manager’s report.

The radio station will provide information about Amber Alerts, school incidents, bridge closures, earthquakes and other types of emergencies.

“During nonemergency times, the station could be used to inform motorists of street repairs, traffic hazards, community events, travel advisories, city history and even visitor information,” the report says.

The city has been working to start a radio station alongside Sustainable Bainbridge, an island nonprofit that created Bainbridge Community Broadcasting.

Bainbridge Community Broadcasting provides podcasts and radio shows online via its website.

Leash ordinance changes will likely be discussed next study session

blog.dogpark

Although the Bainbridge Island City Council did not discuss updating the animal ordinance during Tuesday’s meeting, it is expected to be on the council’s next study session agenda.

The proposed changes would require dog owners to leash their dogs in the Winslow and Lynwood Center business areas, as well as city parks. A story in last week’s Islander incorrectly stated the changes would not apply to city-owned parks. The story has been updated online.

The potential ordinance change also would include that the school and park district require dogs to be leashed on their property.

In recent years, the park district has had incidents of off-leash dogs intimidating or injuring people as well as horses.

Under the current city code, dog owners can face up to $1,000 fine for not preventing their dogs from intimidating or injuring pedestrians or cyclists.

Owners failing to keep their dog under voice control or leashed face a citation and up to a $300 fine.

There are no proposed changes to the ordinance’s penalties.

Time for another bridge?

Bainbridge Island Mayor Ann Blair, left, and I during a live video chat with Ed Friedrich.
Bainbridge Island Mayor Ann Blair and I during a live video chat with Ed Friedrich.

Kitsap Sun transportation reporter Ed Friedrich and I had a live video discussion with Mayor Anne Blair on Thursday evening about the future of Agate Pass Bridge and Highway 305 congestion.

Don’t worry if you weren’t able to make it to the live chat, we recorded the conversation and you can watch it below from the Kitsap Sun’s YouTube channel.