Category Archives: Bainbridge Islander

Time for another bridge?

Bainbridge Island Mayor Ann Blair, left, and I during a live video chat with Ed Friedrich.
Bainbridge Island Mayor Ann Blair and I during a live video chat with Ed Friedrich.

Kitsap Sun transportation reporter Ed Friedrich and I had a live video discussion with Mayor Anne Blair on Thursday evening about the future of Agate Pass Bridge and Highway 305 congestion.

Don’t worry if you weren’t able to make it to the live chat, we recorded the conversation and you can watch it below from the Kitsap Sun’s YouTube channel.

Where do you gas up?

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Last week, Kitsap Sun business reporter Tad Sooter wrote about how there will be one less gas station on the island.

Brown Bear Car Wash will be shutting down its Chevron station off off Hildebrand Lane, leaving the island with only two gas stations.

Brown Bear also owns the station on Highway 305 and High School Road. That station will stay open.

The other gas station on the island is a 76 station that operates in Island Center.

 

Where do you buy gas on Bainbridge Island?

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Police blotter for Feb. 27 islander

polie_blotter_logoDog poop smeared under car handles
After an argument between guests at a bed and breakfast and neighbors about where to park on the 11200 block of Wing Point Drive, dog feces were found smeared under the guest and his family’s car door handles on Feb. 20.
The neighbor was upset the guest had parked in her driveway while he waited for family members to leave the bed and breakfast. The guest told police he had only planned to leave the car there for a few minutes.
The neighbor said she did not put the dog feces on the car, “but that dog feces is common in the neighborhood.”

Can’t drive after smoking pot
Officer Sias found a an 18-year-old woman and 20-year-old man smoking pot in a parked car at Rotary Park ball fields off Weaver Road about 10:30 p.m. Feb. 24.
Sias’s report said he was concerned the man, who was in the driver seat, was going to try and drive after smoking. After he told them they couldn’t drive away, the woman had her mother come pick them up.

Cutting in line with a concealed weapon
After a pickup truck driver was confronted for cutting in line at the Winslow ferry terminal Sunday and said he had a concealed weapon, he drove off pointing his hand in the shape of a gun at the complaining man.
A man saw the white GMC pickup truck cut in line, grabbed a “report something” card from the ticket booth and put it on the truck’s windshield. That was when the driver told him he had a concealed weapon.
The man told police he was startled by the statement and finger pointing at first, but did not feel he was being threatened. He added that the driver was with his family and might have feared someone approaching the vehicle.

DUI with child, dogs in car
After reports of an SUV swerving into oncoming traffic on Highway 305, police found the vehicle — and its driver — in a parking lot Wallace Way off Madison Avenue just after midnight Monday morning.
Officer Ben Sias saw a woman, small child and two small dogs walking away from the Ford Explorer, which was not in a parking spot.
While the child said the dogs had been loose in the SUV, the woman told Sias she had about three drinks at an event in Indianola and the family had brought two cars.
The woman was slurring her words, had blood-shot eyes and was swaying, the report said.
After performing several sobriety tests, Sias asked the child to take the dogs into the apartment. After the child was gone, he arrested the woman.
She had blood alcohol breath samples that measured .179 and .172.

City cutting the cord on Blink car charging station

charging-station
A Blink charging station in Port Orchard. Kitsap Sun file photo.

Electric car owners will have a working charging station in Winslow.

A Chargepoint Electric Vehicle station will be put in place of the Blink station that has been “out of service for quite some time,” said Barry Loveless, Bainbridge Island public works director.

The Blink station has been down for several months and has been working intermittently for about a year.

The situation will be different with Chargepoint, Loveless said.

“They have a good record of maintenance and response to service,” he said.

To repair the current station, Blink wanted keep 60 percent of the profits from the station and have the city to agree to an exclusive 4-year contract that would allow only Blink stations at city facilities.

Chargepoint will keep only 10 percent of the fees, and the city will have full control of setting the fees with a 3-year contract.

The city will even be able to monitor the usage online, including the time and hours of usage.

“We can be as sophisticated as we want to be as far as setting the rates,” Loveless said.

That was not the case with Blink.

Blink had not been as forthcoming with usage data, said Rex Oliver, Bainbridge Island Chamber of Commerce president.

While the new station will have two charging cables, there will only be one designated spot for electric car charging like there is now.

“Until there is a proven need, which we would learn by the use of [the new charging station], I am not in favor of taking a new spot,” Mayor Ann Blair said. “The advantage is we will learn what the demand is.”

The new station is estimated to cost about $8,200.

Police blotter for Feb. 20 Islander

polie_blotter_logoFireworks used to blow up mailboxes
Mailboxes on Bainbridge Island were recent targets of firework vandalism.
Bainbridge Island Police responded to three separate calls of exploding mailboxes on Feb. 10 — one on the 15700 block of Euclid Avenue, one on the 12200 block of North Madison Avenue and another on the 7100 block of Eagle Harbor Drive.
Reserve officer Mike Chamness heard a large explosion near Captain Johnston Blakely Elementary School that sounded like a firework or M-80 about 12:30 a.m. that day.
As another officer checked the neighborhood around the school there were multiple 911 calls about other firework explosions on the island.
A damaged mailbox was found shortly after on Euclid Avenue along with “remnants of an explosive device” that could have been a sparkler bomb, according to the report.
While a neighbor told police the mailbox owner had a dog that was not well liked in the community, other mailboxes on the island were blown up with similar fireworks later in the day.

Bainbridge boys, girls end hoops seasons update

Bainbridge’s Dawson Gonwick (12) is fouled by Cleveland’s Jerome Petty as he takes a shot on Tuesday. MEEGAN M. REID / KITSAP SUN
Bainbridge’s Dawson Gonwick (12) is fouled by Cleveland’s Jerome Petty as he takes a shot on Tuesday. MEEGAN M. REID / KITSAP SUN

The Islander ran story this week about the difficulties the Spartans face on the road to state.

Neither Spartan basketball team will move on to the SeaKing District tournament this year after falling twice, respectively, this week.

The Bainbridge High boys (11-10) saw their season come to an end Thursday night with a 67-62 loss to West Seattle (11-12) in the Metro League tournament.

The Bainbridge High girls (8-14) were also eliminated Thursday in the Metro League tournament, by Seattle Prep, 40-32.

Both boys and girls teams lost to Blanchet Wednesday in the double-elimination Metro League tournament.

Police blotter is back

polie_blotter_logoWe are bringing back the police blotter.

I’ll be posting weekly entries on Mondays. If there is a Monday holiday it will moved to Tuesday.

I won’t be typing up every reported crime. The Islander blotter will be similar to the Kitsap Sun’s Code 911 reports.

If you have questions about why an incident was or wasn’t in the blotter email me at rachel.seymour@kitsapsun.com.

Mail prowler on Bucklin Hill Road
A woman saw a man going through her and her neighbor’s mailbox around 5 p.m. while walking her dog home Jan. 22 on the 7800 NE Bucklin Hill Road.
The man had been cleaning the neighbor’s driveway when she walked by earlier, and he appeared to be with a window cleaning company, she told police.
The woman said she watched the man open the box, take out the contents and throw the box on the ground, before running after him and confronting him.
After he handed her the contents and told her he was just putting it back, she called 911.
The man was gone by the time police arrived, the report said.

Lockbox cut at waste facility
An employee of Bainbridge Disposal got to work Monday, Jan. 26 around 8:30 a.m. and discovered the gate unlatched and the lockbox cut open.
The lockbox had been intact the Friday before.
The employee was not sure if anything was missing from the lockbox, and the company is reviewing its surveillance video, the police report said.

Driver sends pedestrian spinning
A man walking across Hildebrand Lane in the crosswalk by Highschool Road Jan. 26 about 1:30 p.m. when he was hit by a vehicle, spinning him around and injuring his left arm. The man told police the driver stopped to shake his fist at him before diving south on Hildebrand Lane.
The man described the driver as an asian man in his 40s.
There was no description of the vehicle in the police report.

Community resource officer could help mend relationships with residents

 Bainbridge Island Police Department evidence technician Jennifer Cooper, Lt. Chris Jensen and Reserve Officer Mark Crowthers inspect ammunition turned in by a Bainbridge resident in 2013. TAD SOOTER / KITSAP SUN
Bainbridge Island Police Department evidence technician Jennifer Cooper, Lt. Chris Jensen and Reserve Officer Mark Crowthers inspect ammunition turned in by a Bainbridge resident. TAD SOOTER / KITSAP SUN

Bainbridge Island Police Department is looking to improve its once rocky relationship with residents through a designated community resource officer.

“When you have that good relationship of trust between officers and the community, we’re more effective,” said Police Chief Matthew Hamner.

City Council unanimously gave the department the go-ahead to apply for a federal grant that would cover 75 percent of the $100,000 annual salary and benefits of the community resource officer for three years. The department would cover the full cost the fourth year.

The community resource officer would be responsible for community related events and programs with the department, such as the citizen police academy, neighborhood watches and the police youth advisory group.

The community resource officer would be a liaison for the island schools, although it would be up to the schools how often the officer meets with students.

While the district has been without a school resource officer for more than a decade, there might not be a great demand for one just yet.

The district recently determined students and parents felt safe at the schools based on surveys and meetings with the police department, said Galen Crawford, communications specialist with Bainbridge Island School District.

Although residents don’t have a safety concern for the schools, community trust in the police department was waning and the City Council was split on whether to support a school resource officer before Hamner became chief in June 2013.

In May 2011, the council stalled in a 3-3 vote to apply for a school resource officer grant.

The city manager at the time, Brenda Bauer, blamed a Facebook post by Officer Michelle Vollmer for turning the council against the grant, a post Vollmer said was a joke.

Vollmer’s Facebook comment was one of a string of issues the Bainbridge Island Police faced.

In October 2010, a Bainbridge officer shot and killed a mentally ill man during a welfare check, ending in a $1.4 million lawsuit settlement and a federal jury finding the city and then Police Chief Jon Fehlman at fault for not providing enough training for handling situations with mentally ill residents.

Another officer — president of the Bainbridge police guild at the time — was accused of harassing City Council members the same month as the fatal shooting.

During the summer of 2011, the department hired a volunteer reserve officer — giving him a badge and the authority to carry a gun — who had a criminal history, including a misdemeanor assault charge and a weapons charge.

City Council learned about the reserve officer’s background a couple months after he was hired, and he was asked to resign.

Fehlman was the Bainbridge Island police chief during each of these issues. He resigned in September 2012.

Public support for the police department has been increasing, Hamner said, citing the council’s approval for a community resource officer and the police department having more residents apply for the citizen police academy than there were spots available.

“I think the chief has shown he has the best interest of this community and our children at hand time and time again,” said resident Dominique Cantwell, a former board member of the Bainbridge Youth Services.

A full story on the community resource officer grant will be available on the Kitsap Sun website.

This post has been updated to include a response from the school district.