Daily Archives: June 18, 2015

BARN awarded $500K grant

barn_logo2Bainbridge Artisan Resource Network (BARN) has earned a $500,000 grant from the C. Keith Birkenfeld Memorial Trust for a new facility.

This grant pushes BARN’s campaign for a 25,000-square-foot artisan center over $5 million, and closer to its $7.5 million goal, said Carolyn Goodwin, BARN spokeswoman.

BARN is currently in a 2,000-square-foot facility, which was meant to be a temporary location for the nonprofit. It is home to metalworking, fiber arts, writing, printmaking and glass work, among others.

BARN is a nonprofit organization, which formed in 2012 to operate a “hands-on center for craft and invention” on the island.

The organization is hoping to break ground this fall on the new center.

 

Orange is the new bench color, but not officially

One of the benches that has been painted orange near along Winslow Way. Tristan Baurick/Kitsap Sun
One of the benches that has been painted orange near along Winslow Way.
Photos by Tristan Baurick/Kitsap Sun

Tristan Baurick/Kitsap SunAt least four small cement cube benches along Winslow Way were “mysteriously” painted orange recently without consent from city officials, said City Manager Doug Schulze.

The city is trying to find out who did it.

“The issue we have now is cleanup of this might be problematic,” Schulze told the council Tuesday. “Because pressure washing or using some sort of solvent could damage the surface of the concrete.”

The city could leave the benches orange or paint over them with a cement gray color.

“If you hear any rumors about who might have done this, we’d like to chat with them so this doesn’t continue,” Schulze said.

Requesting proposals, not a consultant, for Suzuki property sale

suzukimapBainbridge Island could be asking for proposals for the Suzuki property, instead of hiring consultants.

Councilman Val Tollefson said a council subcommittee he is on decided hiring a consultant — who would breakdown how much money could be made on the property based on the buyer and development purpose — would leave the city right where is was Tuesday, needing to ask for proposals.

Interested parties would have 45 days to respond to the published request, which is expected to have a list of priorities for the Suzuki property laid out by the city.

Those priorities are:

  • Affordable housing or mixed housing with affordable and market-value houses.
  • Green and sustainable construction.
  • Open space, community gardens and connecting trails.
  • Integration with adjacent neighborhoods and island character.

Tollefson also suggested the public should have input on the proposals the city receives.

Several residents have voiced concern about traffic issues and housing density. Others have asked the city to leave the property as is.

The school district is not interesting in buying the property, Mayor Anne Blair said.

The council has previously talked about allowing affordable housing to be built on the land.

“Frankly, the city owns a valuable piece of property and needs some money,” Tollefson said.

The undeveloped Suzuki land is assessed at about $500,000, according to county documents, which is the price the city paid for the property in 2000.

The City Council decided to sell the 14-acre Suzuki property in 2008, and use the money to pay for a new police station.

Last week, the council selected a site for a new police station and court facility. It is estimated to cost about $15 million, including buying land.